Singh Research Group

Our research effort centers on creating functional “living” immune tissues as organoids or on-chip to recapitulate selective aspects of lymph nodes. the engineered tissues communicate dynamically with human and mouse immune cells and using engineered approaches we are able to manipulate cell’s behavior. Using engineering principles, we study how various components of lymphoid tissues interact with immune cells, their tumors, and how immune cells undergo decision making at the cellular, molecular, and epigenetic (chromatin) levels to protect humans from infectious threats. We use these discoveries to develop new immune therapeutics. Our particular interest is in germinal center B cells that make antibodies and T cells that communicate with B cells. We are further interested in understanding how disruption of normal immune processes results in the transformation of “protector” immune cells to immune neoplasms.

We have four major directions:

  • Immuno-engineering: Develop ex vivo immune tissues or lymphatic-on-chip by integrating immune cells, biomaterials, cell adhesion and cell-matrix interactions, tissue mechanics, transport and fluid flow. These engineered ex vivo immune organs have application in immunity, cancer, infections, and inflammation.
  • Cancer Bioengineering: Develop ex vivo “malignant” immune tissues by integrating lymphoma cells, biomaterials, tissue mechanics, transport and fluid flow. Specific focus areas include B cell receptor signaling and epigenetics.
  • Immunomodulation in Metabolic Syndrome: Study the effect of metabolic syndrome on bioengineered system and develop new immunomodulatory biomaterials
  • Micro-Nano-Bioengineering: Develop engineered micro-nano-technologies to modulate immunity and develop teratoma-free therapeutic stem cells. A new focus of our research is in prostate cancer.

Research in Singh laboratory is supported by the National Institute of Health (The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; National Cancer Institute), Department of Defense, National Science Foundation, 3M, Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, WCM Prostate Cancer SPORE initiative, WCM-CU Seed, and Cornell Animal Health Center.

 

Recent News

Matt and Jess win NIH T32 fellowships!

Nov, 2018: Congratulations to Singh lab’s Matthew Mosquera and August/Singh lab co-advised Jessica Elmore on being selected for support from the NIH/NIBIB funded new ImmunoEngineering T32 training grant! Good luck w/ your exciting research on immunology,...